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This and That

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Dry Bones

ViestiKirjoittaja Annukka » 06.02.2014 11:41

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Annukka
 
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Liittynyt: 24.11.2013 21:34

Dryu Bones

ViestiKirjoittaja Annukka » 07.02.2014 10:04

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Annukka
 
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The Power of Kindness

ViestiKirjoittaja Annukka » 10.02.2014 17:09

Excerpt from
The Power of Kindness

by Mac Anderson

Flowers The year was 1863, on a spring day in Northern Pennsylvania. A poor boy was selling goods door-to-door to pay his way through school. He realized he had only a dime left, and that he was hungry. So he decided he would ask for a meal at the next house. However, he lost his nerve when a lovely young woman opened the door.

Instead of a meal, he asked for a drink of water. She thought he looked hungry and so she brought him a large glass of milk. He drank it slowly, and then asked, "How much do I owe you?"

"You don't owe me anything," she replied. "Mother has taught us never to accept pay for a kindness." He said, "Then I thank you from my heart." As Howard Kelly left that house, he not only felt stronger physically, but his faith in God and man was strengthened also. He had been ready to give up and quit.
Years later, that young woman became critically ill. The local doctors were baffled. They finally sent her to the big city, where they called in specialists to study her rare disease.

Dr. Howard Kelly was called in for the consultation. When he heard the name of the town she came from, he went down the hall of the hospital to her room. Dressed in his doctor's gown, he went in to see her. He recognized her at once. He went back to the consultation room determined to do his best to save her life. From that day, he gave special attention to the case.

After a long struggle, the battle was won. Dr. Kelly requested from the business office to pass the final billing to him for approval. He looked at it, then wrote something on the edge, and the bill was sent to her room. She feared to open it, for she was sure it would take the rest of her life to pay for it all. Finally, she looked, and something caught her attention on the side of the bill. She read these words:
Paid in full with one glass of milk
Glass of milk
*Dr. Howard Kelly was a distinguished physician who, in 1895, founded the Johns Hopkins Division of Gynecologic Oncology at Johns Hopkins University. According to Dr. Kelly's biographer, Audrey Davis, the doctor was on a walking trip through Northern Pennsylvania one spring day when he stopped by a farm house for a drink of water.
This beautiful story about Dr. Howard Kelly is one of many true stories found in The Power of Kindness. I love the quote from Leo Buscaglia:
"Too often we underestimate the power of a touch, a smile, a kind word, a listening ear, an honest compliment, or the smallest act of caring, all of which have the potential to turn a life around."
Quite frankly, this is the part about kindness that we all understand. But it's the other part that many of us fail to grasp.

That is...practicing random acts of kindness can change our lives! And that is what this book is all about.

The great English writer, Aldous Huxley, was a pioneer in the study techniques to develop human potential. In a lecture toward the end of his life, he said this:
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Annukka
 
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Liittynyt: 24.11.2013 21:34

10 Tips to Prevent Cyberbullying in Your Child’s Life

ViestiKirjoittaja Annukka » 11.02.2014 09:29

10 Tips to Prevent Cyberbullying in Your Child’s Life

By Suzanne Handler

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A 12-year-old girl in Florida recently leapt to her death after she was relentlessly bullied by her classmates. Even after she switched schools, the bullying continued—online.

The brave new world of technology has spawned a monster: the cyberbully. For those unfamiliar with the term cyberbullying, according to the website stopbullying.gov it is “bullying that takes place using electronic technology . . . Examples of cyberbullying include mean text messages or e‑mails, rumors sent by e‑mail or posted on social networking sites, and embarrassing pictures, videos, websites or fake profiles.”

Cyberbullying is a real and serious threat to the wellbeing of our children. For all the positive advancements and convenience electronic Even after she switched schools, the bullying continued—onlinedevices such as cell phones and computers bring to our lives, there also lurks a sinister side to this technology that cannot be ignored. It is beyond disturbing to think that such a device, in the hands of thoughtless youth, can morph into a weapon with the potential to drive another human being to take his or her own life.

The statistics on cyberbullying are alarming. According to dosomething.org, a website for teens that addresses social issues, nearly 43 percent of all kids have been bullied online, 1 in 4 has had it happen more than once, and only 1 in 10 victims will inform a parent or trusted adult of the abuse. Most disturbing, as reported on this same website, those being cyberbullied are 2 to 9 times more likely to consider committing suicide.

More insidious and lethal than the garden-variety schoolyard bully of yesteryear, the cyberbully targets his or her victim with e‑mails, tweets and texts, rendering impotent the old adage that “sticks and stones may break my bones, but words will never hurt me.” If the perpetrator’s aim is accurate, striking countless blows to the most vulnerable girl or boy in any social or classroom setting, the words do hurt; in fact, they have the potential to kill.

The Jewish perspective on verbal (and nonverbal) abuse is simple yet eloquent: “You shall not wrong one another, and you shall fear your G‑d.”1 Rashi clarifies: “This refers to verbal oppression (ona’at devarim), namely that a person may not antagonize another, nor give him bad advice in order to benefit himself. And if you were to ask, ‘Who would ever know my secret intentions?’ the verse ends with ‘fear G‑d,’ the One who knows.”

Parents need to carefully consider whether or not to allow the Internet into their home. The Internet can bring a variety of negative influences into the home, of which cyberbullying is only one example. If you do decide to allow the Internet, here are some precautions to take to protect your child from becoming a victim, a bystander, or even the instigator of cyberbullying:

Know your child’s passwords and screen names for all e‑mail accounts, social media applications and electronic devices. Allow your child to have a Facebook or Twitter account only if you can be friends/followers.
Monitor what your child writes on his or her electronic device(s) and the family computer. Regularly check the Internet search history. (The girl who committed suicide in Florida had searched for ways to kill herself, which was discovered later in her search history.)
Learn the current terminology used by youth today when corresponding with each other.
Attend school or community functions where cyberbullying is being discussed. Talk with other parents and your child’s Learn the current terminologyteacher and school counselor if you suspect your child is involved in cyberbullying.
Watch for any sudden or ongoing signs that your child seems anxious, fearful, withdrawn, or uninterested in school or being with former friends.
Demonstrate to your child that you can be trusted with any cyberbullying information he or she shares with you. Explain that you will keep his or her confidence as long as no one’s safety or health is at risk.
Explain that you don’t intend to punish your child for being truthful about his or her involvement in cyberbullying. Keep the lines of communication as open as possible with careful, non-threatening conversation.
Carefully monitor your own reaction if your child reports being cyberbullied. Try to stay calm as you plan your next steps.
In an age-appropriate manner, explain what happened in Florida, or in a similar cyberbullying situation, and your concern that such a terrible thing must never happen in your family or any other family.
Remind your child to treat others the way he or she would like to be treated. Teach your child to never say or write anything about another person that he or she would not be willing or comfortable to say to that person’s face.

Unfortunately, the frequency of cyberbullying is on the rise, especially among middle-school-age students. Because it is every parent’s responsibility to protect his or her child from harm, consider discussing the dangers of cyberbullying with your kids today.
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Annukka
 
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Unbelievable

ViestiKirjoittaja Annukka » 11.02.2014 09:46

Unbelievable


Nine-year-old Joey was asked by his mother what he had learned in Sunday school.

“Well, Mom, our teacher told us how G‑d sent Moses behind enemy lines on a rescue mission to lead the Israelites out of Egypt. When he got to the Red Sea, he had his engineers build a pontoon bridge, and all the people walked across safely. Then, he used his walkie-talkie to radio headquarters for reinforcements. They sent bombers to blow up the bridge, and all the Israelites were saved.”

“Now, Joey, is that really what your teacher taught you?” his mother asked.

“Well, no, Mom. But if I told it the way the teacher did, you’d never believe it!”
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Annukka
 
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Dry Bones

ViestiKirjoittaja Annukka » 12.02.2014 10:06

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Dry Bones

ViestiKirjoittaja Annukka » 13.02.2014 09:45

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Annukka
 
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Hello Friends!

ViestiKirjoittaja Annukka » 14.02.2014 08:27

A friend is someone who gives you total freedom to be yourself.

-Jim Morrison
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Annukka
 
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ICEJ caring for the Holocaust Survivors

ViestiKirjoittaja Annukka » 15.02.2014 08:44

Survivor profile: Shoshanna Alon

ICEJ caring for the Holocaust Survivors

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By:
Birte Scholz
Posted on:
Wed, 22 Jan 2014 (All day) +0100
Survivor profile: Shoshanna Alon

A Holocaust survivor originally from Austria, Shoshanna Alon lives in a decent neighbourhood in Haifa but her high medical bills recently forced her to start coming to the Haifa Home for lunch. Yet when a severe winter storm hit Israel in mid-December, she was stuck at home.

So Haifa Home director Shimon Sabag sent a team to deliver her food and blankets. But when they arrived, they were shocked to find Shoshanna living in wretched conditions. Garbage and clutter were piled to the ceiling. Cats and cobwebs were everywhere. She had lived with no water or electric for two years due to unpaid bills. Shoshanna showered by pouring cups of water over her head from a neighbour's spigot.

Shoshanna did not seem to mind the decrepit state of her apartment. "It is better than the ghetto", she insisted. "My father and mother died in the Shoah, so why should I complain about no water."

She does not have a mental disorder, just a strong fear of starving again like she did as a child in the Holocaust. Psychiatrists say it is a common fear among many survivors. So she hoarded everything, and never threw anything away.

"This was the most difficult case I have ever seen", said Shimon. "The stench was overpowering and this dear lady was already sick from a medical ailment. I knew that I could not go home and rest in a good bed at night while a woman who had endured the Holocaust lived like this."

Shimon convinced Shoshanna to move out temporarily while his team cleaned and renovated her flat. Volunteers came from area youth centers, IDF bases and police stations, and even fellow survivors pitched in. They literally shovelled mounds of debris out of broken windows into the yard two floors below. In all, 20 tons of refuse were carted off in eight truck loads.

Shoshanna now insists on moving back into her own home. The renovations are almost complete and she can return soon. But Shimon will deliver hot meals to her home every day, and a volunteer will come once a week to keep the place clean. The ICEJ will also join with Shimon to cover her electric and water bills, which had mounted to thousands of shekels.

The entire Haifa area has heard of Shoshanna's story and Shimon's heart for helping others. But he always gives the credit to the ICEJ as his steadfast partner in all his endeavours. "The whole North talks about the Christian Embassy", he says.

To support the Haifa Home and all that it does for Holocaust survivors, you can donate today by clicking the button below:
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Dry Bones

ViestiKirjoittaja Annukka » 15.02.2014 08:56

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